Economic Impacts of Eliminating Colorado’s Fiduciary Tax on Resident Trusts

March, 2013 Nathan Associates Inc. was engaged by Common Sense Policy Roundtable to examine the economic impacts associated with removing Colorado’s fiduciary tax on resident trusts. While nearby states have no taxes on trusts, Colorado’s trust tax laws are unfavorable for setting up and managing trusts. Indeed, estate planners have been advised to avoid Colorado-based trustees. This […]

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 Increasing Tax Revenues & Creating Jobs by Growing Colorado’s Trust Industry

Executive Summary Wealth Transfer and Trusts as a Growth Industry The United States is entering a period of one of the largest wealth transfers in its history. Studies predict that the 78 million baby boomers will transfer $12 trillion in wealth by the decade’s end and $41–$136 trillion by the middleof the century. Several factors […]

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 Economic Impacts of Eliminating Colorado’s Fiduciary Tax on Trusts

Eric Fruits, Ph.D., March, 2012 Economics International Corp. was engaged by Common Sense Policy Roundtable to examine the economic impacts associated with removing Colorado’s fiduciary tax on trusts. While nearby states have no taxes on trusts, Colorado’s trust tax laws are unfavorable for setting up and managing trusts. Indeed, estate planners have been advised to […]

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 Tax Policy and the Colorado Economy

The Effects on Employment and Migration Eric Fruits* Economics International Corp. April 2011 * With the assistance of Randall Pozdena, QuantEcon, Inc. Executive Summary and Key Findings Earlier this year, Colorado Senator Rollie Heath proposed three education-funding initiatives for the November 2011 ballot. The proposed measures would raise the individual and corporate income tax rate from 4.63 […]

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 Colorado’s Fiscal Policy

2006-2010: Kicking the can down the road Colorado has faced a near perpetual budget crisis since 2000, despite dramatic cumulative increases in government revenue in recent years 1. Additionally, the approval of Referendum C in 2005 allowed the state to keep an estimated $3.5 billion in additional General Fund revenue.2 When the recession began in […]

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